Welcome to Mush with P.R.I.D.E

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Providing Responsible Information on a Dog's Environment

Press Release

July 2019 President's Report to the Membership


The amended by-laws recommended by the Bylaws Committee and Board of Directors has passed with 100% of the members who voted in the election casting their ballot for "Yes". Secretary Bear Siragusa will be replacing the outdated copy on the website with the new revision at his earliest opportunity. The new bylaws are applicable immediately. The directors would like to thank all of the members who cast their ballots in this important election.

With the assistance of subject matter experts recruited from the scientific community the Guidelines Committee has completed the full review of the current Mush with P.R.I.D.E. Sled Dog Care Guidelines (3rd Edition). They are still consistent with the best currently available scientific and experiential evidence. The Committee is nonetheless recommending that we begin the process of updating them.

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), "Ensuring animal welfare is a human responsibility that includes consideration for all aspects of animal well-being, including proper housing, management, nutrition, disease prevention and treatment, responsible care, humane handling, and, when necessary, humane euthanasia."

Until relatively recently, the major focus of animal welfare practices has been on avoiding negative experiences from the animal's perspective. Today it is recognized and emphasized that animal welfare management must also include the promotion of positive experiences and there is a good body of both scientific and experiential evidence that can help us produce practical guidelines that mushers and sled dog kennel operators can use to accomplish both.

While it's very early in the process and my virtual crystal ball isn't always clear, some of the changes we predict for a new edition of the Guidelines will include more emphasis on the responsibilities of individual mushers and kennel operators, a wider array of options for individuals to meet those responsibilities, more thorough explanations of the pros and cons of each option that is presented and a more thorough explanation of the evidence on which our recommendations are based.

As we launch this project all of the board members will do our best to keep our members informed. We will likely be asking our members to help gather data, review and provide input for drafts of each chapter and be active participants in the process.

Those who are not yet members of Mush with P.R.I.D.E. who wish to participate in the process are encouraged to join our organization.


Thom "Swanny" Swan

President, Mush with P.R.I.D.E

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Press Release

Mush with P.R.I.D.E. Position Statement on proposed statutes or regulations requiring dogs to be housed inside human dwellings when ambient outside temperatures exceed specifically defined temperature limits


It is Mush with P.R.I.D.E. Board of Director's position that statutes or regulations

requiring dogs to be housed inside human dwellings when ambient outside

temperatures exceed specifically defined temperature limits are detrimental to the

welfare of sled dogs and also to large numbers of working dogs, service dogs and

companion dogs.

- Both the upper and lower critical temperature zones (CTZs) vary considerably

between breeds of dogs, different coat types, age, general health, body condition

and acclimatization of dogs.


CTZs for the many breeds and types of dogs have not


been scientifically established. (1)

- Sled dogs with double-layered hair coats thrive at temperatures considerably

lower than those of a typical human dwelling.(2) Scientific and experiential evidence

indicates that acclimated double-coated dogs such as Siberian Huskies, Alaskan

Malamutes, Alaskan Huskies, and Samoyeds normally housed outdoors may suffer

from heat stress at temperatures generally considered comfortable by humans.(3,4)

- Readily observable signs of temperature related stress are widely published and

distributed online and in professional animal welfare and veterinary medical

literature. Owners and competent animal control or law enforcement

agents can use such signs to determine whether the welfare of an individual dog

is at risk due to extremes in outdoor ambient temperatures. Signs of distress are

sufficient to develop probable cause in cases where law enforcement action is

necessary.


In the medical and veterinary medical communities, it is recognized that evidence-

based medicine should be the standard of practice. It is Mush with P.R.I.D.E.'s


position that sound scientific and experiential evidence should also be the standard

of practice for legislation intended to promote the welfare of all dogs.


References:

1 Mary Jordan, Amy E. Bauer, Judith L. Stella, Candace Croney, Department of

Comparative Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, 2016, Temperature

Requirements for Dogs, Purdue University Center for Animal Welfare Science, PDF,

http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/VA/VA-16-W.pdf

2 National Research Council, 2011. Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals:

Eighth Edition. National Academies Press, Washington, D.C.

3 Johnson, S.I., McMichael, M., White, G., 2006. Heatstroke in small animal medicine:

a clinical practice review. Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care 16(2),

112-119.

4 Mush with P.R.I.D.E., 2019. Poll of Experienced Dog Mushers,

https://www.facebook.com/groups/398468697352924/permalink/54798427573

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Pride on Dog Works Radio!

Our Secretary Bear sat down with Robert Forto of Dog Works Radio to discuss the revitalization of Mush With Pride and what we do, why we do it, and what the future will bring. 



Our Secretary was on Dog Works Radio talking with Robert Forto about Mush with PRIDE!
Our Secretary was on Dog Works Radio talking with Robert Forto about Mush with PRIDE!

Mush with PRIDE Press Release

MUSH WITH PRIDE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 3, 2019
MEDIA CONTACT: Thom Swan, (907) 488-3327, swanny@acsalaska.net


MUSH WITH PRIDE REORGANIZED FOR SLED DOG CARE AND ADVOCACY

The organization Mush with P.R.I.D.E. was established in 1991 by mushers who were concerned about the public perceptions of the training, racing, and care of sled dogs. In 2018 an effort to reorganize and revitalize the organization was begun, and in April of this year a new 10-member international Board of Directors was seated. Officers were duly elected and seven standing committees were created. Committee members were assigned to do the work of rebuilding the structure of the organization, revising and rewriting the guidelines, and re-establishing Mush with P.R.I.D.E. as the gold standard of sled dog care and advocacy.


Mush with P.R.I.D.E. supports the responsible care and humane treatment of all dogs, and is dedicated to enhancing the care and treatment of sled dogs in their traditional and modern uses. The abbreviations in the name, P.R.I.D.E., stand for Providing Responsible Information on a Dog’s Environment. To address some of the concerns, the organization developed sled dog care, equipment, training, and kennel management guidelines which are still being used to educate the general public, mushers, veterinarians, and others in the proper care of sled dogs. Documents available for download at the Mush with P.R.I.D.E. website include Sled Dog Care Guidelines, A Guide to Caring for Dogs During Crisis Situations, and Recommended Kennel Standards and Inspection Guidelines.


Today Mush with P.R.I.D.E. members are found throughout the world, in the United States, Canada, Norway, and the U.K., and the membership is once again steadily increasing. Mush with P.R.I.D.E. guidelines have frequently been used by other groups and agencies when determining responsible dog care and kennel husbandry standards. Member clubs supporting Mush with P.R.I.D.E. include not only Alaskan sled dog groups, but mushing associations, clubs and groups from around the globe, including Canada, Norway, Great Britain, Germany, Jamaica and Australia. Current P.R.I.D.E. members include large competitive kennels, small recreational teams, large and small touring kennels, skijorers, veterinarians, race sponsoring organizations, local mushing clubs and fans of sled dogs. The support and input from the membership is what helps direct the P.R.I.D.E. Board of Directors and establish P.R.I.D.E. as a leading organization promoting responsible sled dog care and dog-powered sports.


For more information visit the Mush with P.R.I.D.E. website at www.mushwithpride.org or Find Us On Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/398468697352924/

- End of Release -


MEDIA CONTACT:
Thom "Swanny" Swan, P.R.I.D.E. Media Relations
Phone: (907) 488-3327
swanny@acsalaska.net

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Favorite Publication Downloads

Sled Dog Care Guidelines

The first edition (1993) was great, the second edition (1998) was better, but the 3rd edition references scientific research that confirms proper care protocals for modern kennels.

Caring for Dogs During Crisis

Mushers must recognize that an unexpected loss of income, medical emergency or other life-changing circumstance could render us unable to properly care for our dogs.  What can we do to ensure proper care of our dogs during a crisis?

Voluntary Kennel Inspection Documents

PRIDE initiated this voluntary kennel inspection program to allow members to document the excellent care that they provide in their kennels every day. Download these documents to learn more about the program.

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Mush with PRIDE

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Kenai, AK  99611