Voluntary Kennel Inspection Program

 Mush with P.R.I.D.E. has established this as a voluntary kennel inspection program. We believe this program will be useful to kennels anywhere in the world, and will serve as a model for other certification programs. 

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Download Documents

Please print and read the attached documents for a full description of the Kennel Inspection Program

10 Basic Kennel Standards

Daily Feeding

 While certain specific training and medical conditions may warrant the temporary withholding of food, under normal circumstances all dogs should be adequately fed and watered at least once a day. 

Adequate Shelter

  All dogs should have available adequate shelter from inclement weather. Usually this means a waterproof and windproof house or other shelter. 

Safe Confinement

Dogs should be securely confined and restricted in a safe manner. Chains and cables used to restrict dogs should be tangle-free and should include a swivel to prevent choking.

Responsible Breeding

  Any kennel that includes an intact female dog should have a heat pen capable of confining the female and preventing breeding with loose males.

Adequate Exercise

  Confinement pens, chains or cables should be of adequate size or length to allow each dog to exercise. 

Fenced Yards

  Kennels in areas that may be visited by young children should be surrounded by a fence of an adequate height and strength to contain loose dogs and keep children out of the yard.

Daily Scooping

All fecal matter should be cleaned up daily.

Veterinary Attention

Dogs should be wormed and vaccinated on a regular basis and should receive a regular veterinary checkup.

Humane Euthanization

   Every dog should be trained to its highest potential.Euthanization is not a substitute for responsible breeding and training. Euthanization, when necessary, should be effected humanely by a qualified individual.

Socialization

Dogs should be socialized at least to the point of accepting handling from strangers. Special training, secure confinement, and neutering should be considered with overly aggressive dogs.